Please select your section instructor below to view the standing Honors contract for your course.

 

**Standing contracts will be updated prior to the start of each semester.

 

CHEMISTRY 167

Dr. Cristina Bonaccorsi

CHEMISTRY 177

Dr. Joseph Awino

CHEMISTRY 178

BIOLOGY 211

Dr. James Colbert

Dr. Nancy Boury

Dr. Lori Biederman

 

Chemistry 167 - Dr. Cristina Bonaccorsi

To achieve the Honors component of CHEM 167, students will:

  1. Use the CHEM 167 Twitter account to share chemistry and engineering-related chemistry news and topics at least once per week. Username and password will be provided by the professor during the first meeting (to be arranged virtually). Send the post to honors-chem@iastate.edu. All students enrolled in the course will be invited to follow @Chem4Engineers.
  2. Work in teams (selected by the 167 course professor) to do the following prior to each exam and prior to the final exam (4 times per semester):        
    1. Research into a real-world chemistry application that is of interest to engineering students and relevant to the upcoming exam. The instructor will tell the team what is the particular topic (e.g. chapter or portion of a chapter) that they need to focus on.
    2. Write a short summary of the application.
    3. Write a minimum of 6 multiple-choice questions that students can use to help prepare for the upcoming exam. The key must be provided as well.

This work will be shared with the students in the class prior to exams for practice. The research summary and questions are due at least one week prior to the exam. In the past, students have successfully cooperated remotely by using Google Docs or other sharing platforms. However, the final product must be a Word document (or other compatible and/or editable format) and must be sent via email to honors-chem@iastate.edu. One document per group and one email per group. One student should take the lead and send the document on behalf of the group.

 

Chemistry 177 - Dr. Joseph Awino

To achieve the Honors component of CHEM 177, I will:

Work individually (or in a team selected by Chem 177 course instructors) to do the following:

  1. Research into a real-world chemistry concept that is of biological/medical/environmental/ industrial application and use the Twitter account to share the news at least once per week. The Instructor will provide guidance to help the individual come up with an appropriate topic. A copy of the tweet must be forwarded to the instructor. All students enrolled in the course will be invited to follow @Cychem.
  2. Avail myself for regular meetings with the instructor (once a month) to discuss progress report.
  3. Write a minimum of 5 multiple-choice questions and send together with a copy of the answer key to the instructor as an attachment as a Word document. This should be done at least one week prior to the scheduled monthly meeting. The questions may be shared with the class for exam review purposes.
  4. Write a proposed summary on how the concept is applicable in solving a specific real-life problem (one page maximum) and send to the instructor. The deadline to submit this proposal is on Friday, November 13, 2020.

 

Biology 211 - Dr. James Colbert

One of the main themes of this course is the amazing amount of biological diversity currently present on Earth. How have we come to know about all of this diversity? Your text describes some of this diversity, but very little about the people who worked – and continue to work - to help us come to understand the great diversity of the natural world.


To complete the Honors component of Biology 211 you will need to:

1. Fill out the required paperwork at the Honors Program
2. Obtain a copy of, and read, both of the following books:

Richard Conniff (2011) The Species Seekers: Heroes, Fools, and the Mad Pursuit of Life on Earth.
Christopher Kemp (2017) The Lost Species: Great Expeditions in the Collections of Natural History Museums

3. Set up a one-hour appointment with me prior to Thanksgiving Break (22 November) to discuss these books and how they relate to Biology 211.
4. Send me an e-mail, prior to the last day of class (12 December) describing in what ways, if any, reading and discussing these books improved your understanding of biological diversity.

 

Biology 211 - Dr. Nancy Boury

Honors students will be updating/refining Wikipedia articles (1 per group of 3 students) that are currently stubs. I have pre-selected topics/page stubs for students to choose from - some genetics, some organism-based, some ecology, which others focus on evolution. Click here to view the rubric (no word limit). Click here for further details.

 

Biology 211 - Dr. Lori Biederman

One of the main themes of this course is the amazing amount of biological diversity currently present on Earth. But did you know that there is a lot of biological diversity in Ames and in your own home?  Your text describes some of this diversity, but there are so many organisms around us that we don't notice or do not appreciate. 

To complete the Honors component of Biology 211 you will need to:

  1. Discuss your interest in a honor’s project via Webex (email lbied@iastate.edu for an appointment).  THIS IS CRITICAL. I will not sign off on your honor’s credit if you do not meet with me before submitting your honor’s paper work.
  2. Fill out the required paperwork at the Honors Program by the appropriate due date.
  3. Obtain a copy of, and read, the following book. The ISU library has a copy if you want to borrow it.

         Dunn, R. (2018) Never Home Alone: From Microbes to Millipedes, Camel Crickets, and Honeybees, the Natural History

         of Where We Live

  1. Download the free iNaturalist app and explore Iowa State Campus or your home and yard.  Post 10 observations of organisms around your home or campus.  These must be YOUR images from the specific organism you are reporting. Using a squirrel image off the web because you saw a squirrel, for example, is plagiarism and unacceptable.  Taking pictures of organisms in zoos is okay, but discouraged. That spider in your basement is a good choice!
  2. Set up a one-hour appointment with me prior to October 31 to discuss the book and share your observations and how they relate to Biology 211.
  3. Send me an e-mail (via Canvas), prior to the last day of class (November 24) with 1-2 paragraphs describing in what ways reading and discussing these books improved your understanding of biological diversity in and around your home and around the ISU campus.